Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) Day Group

DAY GROUP OUTLINE

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT)

Duration: 12 weeks with an option to graduate into our 6 month program

Group Type: Closed

Suits: People who suffer from Borderline or complex personality/psychological disorders.

Overview: Dialectics is a philosophical school of thought, which in short, is about balancing and bringing together contradictory or opposite ideas and trying to find a balance or a synthesis between these two ideas.

Assessment: Over the phone intake assessment required.

Structure of the program: Once you have been assessed for the program you will go on the waiting list for the next available position in the group (intake is every 4 weeks as it is a closed group)

Orientation: After you finish the assessment phase of DBT you will attend an Orientation session. This is where you will have the opportunity to meet other new group members and where the skills trainers will orient you to what you need to know before joining group. It is compulsory for you to attend Orientation. After Orientation you will attend your first day of group.

Group: After Orientation you will attend your first day of group.DBT is broken up into four modules; Mindfulness, Distress Tolerance, Emotion Regulation and Interpersonal Effectiveness.

The first session of every module begins with Mindfulness. Then we work through one of the above modules for a few sessions.

Commitment: DBT is a big commitment. It takes 3 months to complete the program and you will need to attend the skills training group for 3 hours once a week. If you miss up to three group sessions then you will withdraw from the program. As skills trainers we want people to graduate from DBT and we want to prevent you from falling out of therapy, that’s why we assess your suitability and needs prior to admission.

When: Group is held once a week on the following times and days, please call for intake dates as this is a closed group. Intake is every 4 weeks for the 12 week program and 2 months for the 6 month program:

Monday: 11am to 2pm (12 Weeks) & 5pm to 8pm (12 Weeks)

Tuesday: 11:30am – 2:30pm (12 Weeks)

Wednesday: 10:00am – 1:00pm (12 Weeks)

Thursday: 12:30pm – 3:30pm (6 Months) & 6pm – 9pm (6 Months)

Costs: Depends on the health fund that you are insured with and the level of cover you have with that fund. Current uninsured rate to attend is $150 per week/session. If you are interested in being assessed for this group please contact the Groups Coordinator on 1300 122 144 or email groups@thehillsclinic.com.au. Please note there may be a waiting list for assessments and commencement dates.
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What is Dialectical Behaviour Therapy?

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy was developed by a woman named Marsha Linehan who was using Cognitive Behaviour Therapy to treat patients who had been diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder. She found it didn’t work so well on its own because her patients often felt invalidated by the strong focus on change. What Marsha learnt was that these patients needed more validation and acceptance within treatment. She borrowed some meditation techniques from Buddhists philosophy to form the acceptance skills within this new therapy. She called this Therapy Dialectical Behaviour Therapy.

What is Borderline Personality Disorder?

Borderline Personality Disorder is a diagnosis given to individuals suffering from a range of problems. Some of these include, intense negative emotions (anger, shame, guilt, sadness, fear), difficulties in controlling these emotions, usually engaging in impulsive behaviours in an attempt to control them: such as: self-harm, misuse of alcohol or drugs, binge eating, purging, reckless driving etc. They also tend to have unstable relationships, sudden mood swings, feelings of emptiness and chaotic lifestyles. Suicide attempts and/or self-harming are common, and the rate of completed suicide is particularly high in this group.

What causes Borderline Personality Disorder?

DBT answers this important question by introducing what it called the Bio Social Model. Basically this explanation combines two important contributors to the development of Borderline Personality Disorder. The first is the Biology part, which is that Borderline individuals are born with an emotionally sensitive temperament. This means that they experience emotions more intensely than other people and that these emotions tend to stick around for a longer amount of time compared to other people. The second contributing factor is the individual’s environment. This is the ‘Social’ part of the model. DBT explains that if an individual has a sensitive temperament and is then placed in an invalidating environment they are likely to develop the above set of problems. An invalidating environment is where an individual is told by others that what their experience is, is either not real or imagined. Common things told to a Borderline individual are ‘you’re over reacting’, ‘stop being a drama queen’ etc. These sorts of comments made repetitively over time, obviously leave the individual feeling invalidated and not understood.

What causes Borderline Personality Disorder?

DBT answers this important question by introducing what it called the Bio Social Model. Basically this explanation combines two important contributors to the development of Borderline Personality Disorder. The first is the Biology part, which is that Borderline individuals are born with an emotionally sensitive temperament. This means that they experience emotions more intensely than other people and that these emotions tend to stick around for a longer amount of time compared to other people. The second contributing factor is the individual’s environment. This is the ‘Social’ part of the model.DBT explains that if an individual has a sensitive temperament and is then placed in an invalidating environment they are likely to develop the above set of problems. An invalidating environment is where an individual is told by others that what their experience is, is either not real or imagined. Common things told to a Borderline individual are ‘you’re over reacting’, ‘stop being a drama queen’ etc. These sorts of comments made repetitively over time, obviously leave the individual feeling invalidated and not understood.